Pride by Ibi Zoboi

Standard

Pride by Ibi Zoboi
HarperCollins, September 2018.

It’s a truth universally acknowledged that Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice has been used as the basis for many a retelling; in this “remix”, Ibi Zoboi sets her charming and breezy YA romance in present day Bushwick, Brooklyn.

Janae, Zuri, and their three younger sisters live with their Haitian mother and Dominican father, all squashed together in a rundown but joyous 2-bedroom apartment. For Zuri, home is “my parents’ love, my loud sisters, my crowded and cluttered apartment, and the lingering scent of home-cooked meals.”

When the black Darcy family moves into a remodeled mini-mansion across the road, the scene is set for Zuri to be prejudiced and Darius Darcy to be proud. But it also opens up the novel’s larger theme of the gentrification of neighborhoods: “Outsiders moving in to change things up and throw things away.” (And a recent Bloomberg headline “Brooklyn’s Bushwick Zooms Up the List of NYC’s Priciest Neighborhoods” bears Zuri’s fears out). Even though Zuri resents these, mainly white, incursions, she does concede “that the new people moving in, with their extra money and dreams, can sometimes make things better.”

With Janae just back from her first year at Syracuse and narrator Zuri getting ready to apply to Howard, these young women are far from the restrictions placed on the Bennet sisters of the early 19th century: “We’re thinking about our careers and goals and breaking barriers.” Their parents are also much more reasonable than the Austen Bennets: Mami is the life and soul of the block, cooking up a storm at the drop of a hat and Papi keeps the household going by working two jobs.

Darius and his older brother Ainsley (the Bingham love interest for Janae) have wealth and privilege and just don’t fit into Zuri’s idea of the neighborhood: they speak differently, they behave differently, and they seem to be negatively judging the people and the place. On the other hand, Warren, a young man from the neighborhood who headlines himself as “Black Teen Boy from the Projects with Absentee Father Makes It into New York City’s Top Private School” has a lot more appeal for Zuri: “There’s a little bass in his voice, a little hood, a little swag, not like these Darcy boys.”

Ms Zoboi stays close to the structure of the Austen plot, only taking a few liberties with characters’ relationships for the sake of brevity, and it works naturally and really well. Given that it is contemporary YA, Pride does not have the same leisurely pace and depth of character development as Pride and Prejudice, though to be fair most teens I know (and many adults) find Jane Austen interminably slow. And it isn’t really a spoiler to say that pride and prejudice are overcome in satisfying ways and resolution is reached without Zuri compromising her ideals.

Thanks to HarperCollins and Edelweiss for the digital ARC.

One response »

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s