As I Descended by Robin Talley

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AsIDescended-highresAs I Descended by Robin Talley
HarperTeen, September 2016

I have really enjoyed Ms Talley’s two previous books, particularly What We Left Behind  (2015), one of my top books of 2016. Both those books were about, among other things, young women coming to terms with their gender and sexuality. In her latest, many of her characters just happen to be gay and lesbian, and none of them have any issues with this (though their parents might have), and the author has ventured into genre territory – an exceedingly chilling modern day retelling of Macbeth, setting in a Virginia boarding school.

When spirits tell brown-skinned Maria, through a Ouija board, that she will have what she most desires, she decides to take matters into her own hands, goaded on by her white girlfriend Lily. The prize is the prestigious Cawdor Kingsley scholarship, and once the spirits offer it, Maria can’t stop wanting it, and will let nothing get in her way, beginning with deposing Queen Bee, Delilah.

Though this isn’t a completely faithful rendition of Macbeth – none of the characters have children, for example – it is surprisingly close and works extremely well. Some of it is a little forced – the football field is rather clunkily called Dunsinane – but the characters and their motivations and arcs are remarkably faithful. It will work just fine for readers unfamiliar with the Scottish play, but for those who do know it, there are some clever nods and reimaginings.

The story is told from the point of view of several characters, and they are mostly well-developed despite being players in a melodramatic story. However, Maria/Macbeth starts off well, but as she gets further into the web woven for her by the malignant forces, l lost the feel of her and she seemed to become more of a chess piece to get through a plot. However, Lily/Lady Macbeth and Brandon/Banquo avoid this, and are heartbreaking in their roles.

Because it’s based on a Shakespearean tragedy, there is a lot of Gothic drama and the writing becomes very feverish and a little overwrought. However, Ms Talley brings a creepiness that kept me awake and a little nervous in my holiday cottage in Ireland, and which will appeal to fans of Maggie Stiefvater.

Thanks to HarperCollins and Edelweiss for the digital review copy.

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One response »

  1. Pingback: Best of 2016 | bibliobrit

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